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Drills for NOT getting too spread out..

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Drills for NOT getting too spread out..

Postby voile3pc » Sat Sep 14, 2013 1:09 pm

Would be ? How to stop , or at least control better,
creeping boot drift ?
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Re: Drills for NOT getting too spread out..

Postby Rene-Martin Trudel » Sat Sep 14, 2013 9:00 pm

Buy the stiffest boot on the market :)
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Re: Drills for NOT getting too spread out..

Postby voile3pc » Sun Sep 15, 2013 4:11 pm

:D
It's the one directive (don't get too spread out)
that is heard over and over and over, but with
almost NO practical advice on how to avoid doing
so..
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Re: Drills for NOT getting too spread out..

Postby Burma Jones » Mon Sep 16, 2013 2:07 pm

voile3pc wrote::D
It's the one directive (don't get too spread out)
that is heard over and over and over, but with
almost NO practical advice on how to avoid doing
so..

You don't like squeeze the imaginary orange between your knees tip?
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Re: Drills for NOT getting too spread out..

Postby Williamtele » Tue Sep 24, 2013 8:29 am

I assume we're talking about being spread out length-wise. My sense is that it's a by-product of being in a static position....perhaps from an early lead change held throughout the turn. However, if you're constantly moving your skis relative to one another, it will be very difficult to get too spread out. One progressive drill would be practicing quick lead changes starting with a straight run on a reasonably gentle pitch and then incorporating increasingly larger arcs into the run, with the goal being to never let your feet stop moving. If you tend to be an early lead changer (not that there's anything wrong with that) try making the lead change start later and last longer. The added benefits are that the drill promotes balance and even weight distribution and segues nicely into an edging drill as the arcs get bigger.

My 2 cents and you probably overpaid.
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Re: Drills for NOT getting too spread out..

Postby Brenda » Tue Sep 24, 2013 2:47 pm

I get spread out when I get stuck in a turn. Practicing monomarks and early edge change/delayed lead change really helped me with this. At the same time, getting upper and lower body separation, so your upper body is always anticipating the next turn as your feet move under you also seems to help. Much easier to get spread out when your shoulders are traversing, rather than anticipating, IMO. Switching between mono/parallel/tele during a single run helps keep your feet moving as well.

I think what Biff (I think it was) said about bumps is also helpful. In my mind, getting spread out in the bumps is the worse place to be--and one I find myself in still too often. I can ski small/medium bumps just fine, but struggle in icy/bigger bumps/deeper troughs, so take this with a large grain of salt. Something I am working on is consciously thinking about pulling my back leg up under me as I approach the top of a bump. That makes it much easier to pivot and quickly change leads as I head for the next bump. Again, keeping my body in an anticipation position, reaching with my pole downhill to the next bump is key here. Don't get stuck!

Another great drill the NET folks did with Jim Tasse was to suck up your legs as they pass under you and extend your legs into the next turn. Hard to explain here, but a great drill.

I've found that my growth as a skier isn't just about one drill or change. It's really a blend of several different things. I've improved because I work at all these things: keeping my body focused downhill, using my poles to help with the rhythm of the turn, keeping my hands in front of me, smoothing out my turns with mono/delayed lead, etc., and not getting stuck in a turn. All of these things have also made me even more aware of what my feet and lower legs are doing as I am turning too. If I'm struggling, I try to think about where things have broken down. For me, it's almost always about not anticipating my next turn. Amazing to me how doing that fixes so many things.

OK, enough work procrastination! Plus my 0.2 is probably worth half of WillTele!
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Re: Drills for NOT getting too spread out..

Postby franzz » Tue Sep 24, 2013 7:40 pm

If you don't spread It'll be call NTN.. :P
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Re: Drills for NOT getting too spread out..

Postby Burma Jones » Wed Sep 25, 2013 12:06 pm

Brenda wrote:OK, enough work procrastination! Plus my 0.2 is probably worth half of WillTele!

Hopefully, your work does not involve accounting. :lol:

Brenda wrote:Practicing monomarks . . .

And in all seriousness, I've tried monomark turns on a couple of occasions and concluded by brain simply is wired too tightly to be undone. My legs only telemark and refuse to monomark. Should I just keep at it until I break the wiring? Are monomarks really that good of a drill?
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Re: Drills for NOT getting too spread out..

Postby Dirk » Wed Sep 25, 2013 12:32 pm

Burma Jones wrote: Are monomarks really that good of a drill?


Personally, I think it's the best drill there is, short of taking a run without poles. Because you are not changing leads, you can focus on the real differences between a properly weighted tele turn and a p-turn. Once you go back to changing leads, beginner/intermediates will get caught up in the transition and the lead change, and proper weighting of the rear foot, along with ankle/knee/hip flex go out the window, and you're right back to doing fake-a-marks.

For skiers who already have a decent tele-turn, monomarks still help a lot with balance, and can be a godsend in tight trees and bumps when you may not have time for lead changes. That was one of the more helpful things I learned from Mickey Stone.
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Re: Drills for NOT getting too spread out..

Postby Williamtele » Wed Sep 25, 2013 12:59 pm

Monomarks are the WD40 of tele drills. They fix everything....although they lack that intoxicating petroleum fragrance.
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Re: Drills for NOT getting too spread out..

Postby RobRox » Wed Sep 25, 2013 1:56 pm

Shuffles and monomarks are a feature of early season morning runs. It is so tempting to just ski, but since they are both on snow drills it counts :wink:
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Re: Drills for NOT getting too spread out..

Postby RobRox » Thu Sep 26, 2013 2:53 pm

Music is sometimes good: Bill Evans "Loose Blues", for example. Sultry quickness seems to prevent long drawn out sequences with my feet. They pass each other, but the elastic rythm snaps them back for next pass PDQ.

Most ragtime and New Orleans tempos work that way too. Bluegrass absolutely works for quick tempo, short scissoring.
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Re: Drills for NOT getting too spread out..

Postby Grant » Fri Sep 27, 2013 8:49 am

Since I'm not PSIA cert. I come up with lots of my own drills when teaching kids. Besides, you can't really lecture to a bunch of 8-13 year olds and expect them to listen.

One I like is to have think of 'how low can you go'? But the low is getting their butt to 'sit' on their heal of the uphill ski. This keeps a very compact stance and doesn't allow the rear foot to get dragged behind. It also enforces a lot of weight on the uphill ski as well. It's important to do this drill on a mellow slope and remember to counter rotate (keep your hands facing down hill towards a lift tower, ski lodge, etc). I ski along singing, how low can you go, how low can you go and I remind them to pump up and down like a piston (keep the feet moving).

Kind of like this :wink: :

Image
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Re: Drills for NOT getting too spread out..

Postby Rene-Martin Trudel » Mon Sep 30, 2013 8:05 am

Grant wrote:Since I'm not PSIA cert. I come up with lots of my own drills when teaching kids. Besides, you can't really lecture to a bunch of 8-13 year olds and expect them to listen.



Wow, really cool picture Grant.

Where was this taken?
Last edited by Rene-Martin Trudel on Mon Sep 30, 2013 5:57 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Drills for NOT getting too spread out..

Postby Dirk » Mon Sep 30, 2013 12:54 pm

Grant wrote:
One I like is to have think of 'how low can you go'?


Jon Bailey, the guy who taught me to tele 25 years ago, used to ski up behind me screaming "HOW LOW CAN YOU GO? DO THE TELE LIMBO!!!"
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