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Newbie question

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Newbie question

Postby jayc » Thu Sep 26, 2013 2:43 pm

I'm trying to get a handle on the basic elements of telemark technique before my real first free-heel season. I'm with the 50/50 weighting and the 'live between the skis' theory, but I'm unclear on proper foot weighting/pressure. Does the front foot weight the heel and the rear the toe, or do you pretty much stay on the balls of your feet, like in alpine? Are you center-weighting the arcs of both skis simultaneously with the balls of your feet, or is it more of a front ski tail, back ski tip kind of thing?

Also, what does "poodling" mean?
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Re: Newbie question

Postby Brenda » Fri Sep 27, 2013 10:41 am

Hi jayc, and welcome! I think it's much harder to talk about the tele turn when you actually haven't tried it before, but I won't let that won't stop me.

To answer your questions:

1) You want your weight to be firmly on the entire front foot--pressure the entire foot. Weight in the back on the ball of your foot.
2) I actually haven't thought about what part of the ski I am weighting, but I am pretty sure the goal is to weigh the center arcs of both skis at the same time. Someone please correct me if I am wrong.

Poodling = allowing your skis to separate fore and aft so that an avalance poodle can run between your legs.

Poodling example here:

Image

Origin of the term (and other examples) kindly provided here:

viewtopic.php?f=2&t=2952

Excellent tele position:

Image
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Re: Newbie question

Postby Rene-Martin Trudel » Fri Sep 27, 2013 10:43 am

Hi Jayc,

Good question,

The goal here is to have the best balance possible. Starting from there, you can say that being centered on the ball of your front foot and on the below of your rear foot is the proper technique.

Anytime you are having too much weight on your heel, your front ski won't perform as well and you won't be able to react as fast if something was to put you off balance.

Finally, theoretically, the front ski arch will have the weighting centered and the back ski will have the weighting more toward the tip. But, I do not consider this to be an objective. Center your weighting as mentioned above and don't worry about how your skis distribute the weighting.

I wrote a blog post on this if you want more detailed information
http://absolutetelemark.com/telemark-weight-distribution/
http://absolutetelemark.com
"Whether you think you can or you think you can't, you're right" Henry Ford
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Re: Newbie question

Postby Brenda » Fri Sep 27, 2013 10:53 am

Just to pipe in, you want your front foot flat on the ski. You do not want your front heel off the ski. I have had alpine cross over students who thought that was how you skied telemark.
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Re: Newbie question

Postby Rene-Martin Trudel » Fri Sep 27, 2013 10:58 am

Wow Brenda,
We've answered almost simultaneously!

Reading after myself, for me the below is the ball of the foot. The rear foot should have the weight on the ball of the foot. Another way to see that is to feel that your are putting a lot of pressure on the shin pushing the cuff of the boot.

Cheers
http://absolutetelemark.com
"Whether you think you can or you think you can't, you're right" Henry Ford
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Re: Newbie question

Postby jayc » Fri Sep 27, 2013 11:45 am

Brenda wrote:Hi jayc, and welcome! I think it's much harder to talk about the tele turn when you actually haven't tried it before, but I won't let that won't stop me.


I actually HAVE tried it before - kinda. I am an advanced/expert old-fart 25-day/yr mogul basher, but have been fascinated by telemark for years. I finally did a tele demo day last season. I took a total of 4 runs, and (surprisingly) was pretty much able to do it right away. I figured I'd be floundering like my first day on a snowboard (advanced/expert on that too), but that didn't happen - I just copied what I saw others doing for the telemark turn and (amazingly) it worked. I did a beginner run first, then an intermediate run, then an expert run, then an intermediate mogul run. I had a few biffs along the way, but felt in control for the most part and really enjoyed it. After my 4 runs, my legs were completely smoked - didn't work right for the entire rest of the weekend. Well, I was sold immediately and planned on telemarking the next season as my primary sport. After the fact, I learned that I did the typical alpine-crossover mistake of over-weighting my front ski, and probably had my legs too far apart too - I was getting REAL low to keep my balance, especially in the bumps. I learned about the 50/50 weighting and the "between the skis" from reading, and it makes sense. I've already figured out that keeping my knees closer will help prevent the quad obliteration that I experienced, as well as standing up straighter and not getting so low. I figure that will come as I develop more prowess - I expect it should come rather quickly. I do remain a little bit worried about my physical ability to do the sport - I don't share the typical telemarker beanpole body style - I'm stout and heavy, and I have one knee that is trashola with a few spare parts in there and not a lot of cartilage. Hopefully, I won't have to waste my tele rig - new Garmont Prophets w/ new NTN Freerides on Volkl Karma 177 twin-tips (way too short, BTW - stupid twin tips). At any rate, I'm trying to lose 20 pounds, been gently working out my knee and I'm having a clean-up surgery next month (squeeze in a quickie before the ski season starts), and I'm HOPING that all of the quad work involved with telemark actually helps my knee. My orthopedic was excited to hear that I was doing tele - supposed to be just about he best of the ski sports for the knees - we'll see. I just have to mount up my bindings and heat-mold my boots and I'm ready to go. I'm really excited about this coming season.
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Re: Newbie question

Postby Brenda » Fri Sep 27, 2013 12:24 pm

Jayc, love the enthusiasm! I don't know where you got the idea that all telewhackers are beanpoles. I am no beanpole, and I do just fine! We come in all shapes and sizes, so don't worry about that. Also, as you get better at it, the less work it takes, so the less stress on the legs. However, getting in shape and building quad strength is important--as important for any type of skiing. Getting way low will smoke your legs too, so try a more upright stance. Finally, lessons shorten the learning curve by MILES. :)
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Re: Newbie question

Postby flyingcow » Fri Sep 27, 2013 4:14 pm

jayc wrote: I do remain a little bit worried about my physical ability to do the sport - I don't share the typical telemarker beanpole body style - I'm stout and heavy, and I have one knee that is trashola with a few spare parts in there and not a lot of cartilage. Hopefully, I won't have to waste my tele rig - new Garmont Prophets w/ new NTN Freerides on Volkl Karma 177 twin-tips (way too short, BTW - stupid twin tips). At any rate, I'm trying to lose 20 pounds, been gently working out my knee and I'm having a clean-up surgery next month (squeeze in a quickie before the ski season starts), and I'm HOPING that all of the quad work involved with telemark actually helps my knee. My orthopedic was excited to hear that I was doing tele - supposed to be just about he best of the ski sports for the knees - we'll see. I just have to mount up my bindings and heat-mold my boots and I'm ready to go. I'm really excited about this coming season.



I'm a hair shy of 6'4 and about 320 lbs. You can ski tele. All the knee pain I got from skiing alpine disappeared when I made the jump. As you develop those muscles, the strain on your knees plummets. If you have patellofemoral syndrome, you will need to be careful, but I just use patella straps when I'm skiing back to back days and that seems to keep it in check.
Far less perfect than Zim.
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Re: Newbie question

Postby Paul » Sun Sep 29, 2013 6:01 pm

"The rear foot should have the weight on the ball of the foot."?
IMO if you are going to working on "Carving" your skis through the turn then having the weight on the Ball/Big Toe of the lead foot and the weight on the pinky toe of the trailing foot will work wonders.
Chicks just dig carvers.
I do understand that for sliding/skidding your turns then the ball of foot method it the way to go.
and using a flat ski in tricky conditions/terrain can be beneficial.
think monomark turns while entering narrow passages ect.

(must be all those years on the Europa Cup running gates that makes me want to carve my turns).
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