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Feedback from early season turns

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Feedback from early season turns

Postby Williamtele » Fri Nov 30, 2018 11:30 am

So I've been out 2 times so far this season and with this week's dump, I'm very excited for the weekend. The first runs have been devoted to getting the rust off.....literally off my neglected edges, and more figuratively off my muscles, bones and brain as I try to remember how to get down the hill. I'll keep this short, but I'm interested in getting a thread going about what you think about early in the season. Just to kick it off, I think about varying different aspects of my lead change....when and how do I start it, how long does it last, how is pressure applied, etc. What do you think about?
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Re: Feedback from early season turns

Postby telehubby » Sat Dec 01, 2018 6:29 pm

Bill, as I started reading your post I was thinking "lead change". Then I read your sentence about lead change. Perfect! Definitely one of the more important aspects of our turn. I think that after spending seven months on a mountain bike getting my brain to fire all the muscles in the correct sequence to make a fluid and efficient tele turn takes some conscious effort. I also try to be aware of fore/aft pressure. As I work on the timing of my lead change I will play with pressuring my skis in different ways. Sometimes I keep more weight on the lead ski as I move through the lead change until the feet pass and I get that pinky toe pressure. Other times I will have more weight on the back ski and "pull" the lead ski back until I can sink into the tele stance and start over. I feel it helps my muscles "remember" all the movements and timing of the dance we do. Not only does it refine my turn I think it also helps fill my bag of tricks that I will be able to call on later in the season in different conditions and/or terrain.
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Re: Feedback from early season turns

Postby Williamtele » Mon Dec 03, 2018 3:28 pm

Here's another annoying acronym to think about (or not) when you're playing with lead change: D.I.R.T. It stands for Duration, Intensity, Rate, and Timing.

Duration: how long does the lead change last? Is it quick and over before you hit the fall line or does it last through the entire turn. Try it both ways. The "best" way might depend on conditions, the pitch of the trail, or how many beers you've had.
Intensity: this relates to how you release and apply pressure. Are you popping up to take pressure off your skis (extending) or pulling your legs up underneath you (retracting)? Again, conditions might dictate the most effective movement. Try different techniques.
Rate: How quickly are you making your turns? if you're always making the same shaped turns try speeding them up or slowing them down - to extremes. Try making "micro-turns" as fast as you can (preferably on relatively flat terrain) and then try some excruciatingly slow ones, making that transition last as long as you can.
Timing: there's some overlap here with duration but when do you begin your lead change? How does it relate to edge change. Which happens first? Try some monomarks to see if you can change edges without changing leads. If you master the monomark, you are on your way to becoming a tele-Jedi.

Each one of these Letters could be expanded into an hour-long lesson or practice session, but I present them more as things to think about when you ski. Our sport is defined by the lead change and there are many, many ways to do it.
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Re: Feedback from early season turns

Postby Brenda » Mon Dec 03, 2018 5:57 pm

The best feedback I got was in the woods this weekend--I can in fact still do tele turns--and enjoy it!

Honestly, after a PSIA "fling" to reup my cert a couple of years ago where I was basically called a beginning skier, I honestly have no idea what I am doing anymore, right or wrong. I think I know how to ski using a delayed lead change, but apparently not like I should. Add to that how being on NTN changes the way I need to ski (I find it harder to tele on NTN, which may explain something), and a chronic hip issue which has affected my fitness, I have mostly been doing p-turns at resorts just to keep up and extend my day. Having never been an alpine skier (I went from zero to tele, possibly a big mistake), I have also discovered how much FUN p-turns can be. And boy bumps sure are a lot easier.

My plan this year is to take some alpine lessons on my NTN gear to improve my p-turns (which I anticipate will help my tele), and tele in the backcountry--where no one can see me :lol: :lol: ! I kid, but I do expect I'll take some tele lessons as well, because I feel feel pretty confused about what I should be doing. Bill, I should ring you up sometime.
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Re: Feedback from early season turns

Postby Williamtele » Tue Dec 04, 2018 9:37 am

Anytime!
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