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Newbie

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Newbie

Postby billmats » Wed Dec 20, 2017 4:02 pm

I took a lesson with Williamtele a couple years ago...thank you. Picked up some used gear last year and trying to make this the season I nail down the turn. Is it normal to find balancing on both skis as difficult as I do? Do you keep pressure on your shin of the downhill ski while deep in the turn? I tend to become more flat footed and just lose my balance, then I'm back to alpine turning. Or is this like playing bagpipes...you never really get it, it's practice for the rest of your life. PS I just turned 70 so I may not have that long to practice:>) Is Williamtele still giving lessons?
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Re: Newbie

Postby Biff » Wed Dec 20, 2017 6:50 pm

billmats wrote:I took a lesson with Williamtele a couple years ago...thank you. Picked up some used gear last year and trying to make this the season I nail down the turn. Is it normal to find balancing on both skis as difficult as I do? Do you keep pressure on your shin of the downhill ski while deep in the turn? I tend to become more flat footed and just lose my balance, then I'm back to alpine turning. Or is this like playing bagpipes...you never really get it, it's practice for the rest of your life. PS I just turned 70 so I may not have that long to practice:>) Is Williamtele still giving lessons?


Hi Bill and welcome to the forum. We need all the people we can get!! One thing you will really want to work on is keeping weight on that back ski through the turn. It's a common mistake of newbies to put way too much on the downhill ski and end up with a "fake-a-mark" or just back to parallel. Williamtelle is still teaching and in fact just earned his Level 111.... a difficult feat. I'm sure he will see this post and come to your rescue soon.
The only "normal" people are the ones you don't know.
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Re: Newbie

Postby The Court General » Fri Dec 22, 2017 8:50 am

Don't worry too much about your form, it will come. Just enjoy the skiing, no matter how you do it :wink: I started tele last year after 30 years of alpine skiing. It has been a blast learning.

Biff, Thank you for your post! I took the day off yesterday and headed to the local hill. I was struggling early with my rear ski fluttering back and forth. I knew something was amiss, but could not figure it out. I read your post when I came into the lodge to eat my lunch and realized my weight distribution was all wrong. After lunch I started putting more weight on the trailing ski and that made all of the difference.
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Re: Newbie

Postby Dirk » Fri Dec 22, 2017 8:59 am

Biff wrote:Williamtelle is still teaching and in fact just earned his Level 111.... a difficult feat. I'm sure he will see this post and come to your rescue soon.


Bill got his level one hundred and eleven? Wow! Even Mickey Stone hasn't pulled that off.
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Re: Newbie

Postby phoenix » Fri Dec 22, 2017 5:17 pm

Was gonna say what Biff said; coming from parallel technique, first thing I'd suggest is weighting the rear ski... the front ski will take care of itself. If you're focusing on balancing the two, ypu might not really feel solid at all, as you're experiencing. Took a concentrated effort for me to wean myself away for the fake-a-mark ( relying on the lead ski, the back leg just tagging/tiptoeing along).
Think about pressuring the ball of your back foot in the turn. It's do-able, even at 70. Make lots of turns on your local practice slopes, concentrate on tele's rather than parallel. Once it clicks for you, you can personalize your style, and get back to mixing in parallels when you want.
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Re: Newbie

Postby Biff » Fri Dec 22, 2017 7:40 pm

Back in my teaching days one of my favorite things to get a student to do was to "make the turns with your back foot". On easy terrain keep the weight back even more than you think you should and steer your rear foot into the turn. Don't even think about your downhill ski. It will feel awkward but it teaches you how important that rear foot really is. When you do it right you will feel your knee on that rear leg sticking out. Thats what you are looking for. I read an article years ago in a ski mag giving an alpine lesson and they called it the "cowboy turn" because you felt bowl legged. That article, even though it was for alpine skiing, was a real eye opener for me.
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Re: Newbie

Postby benny » Fri Dec 22, 2017 8:27 pm

Per Biff:

I skied MRG today. The snow was spectacular. It was only my second day on skis this season and I had a lot of trouble getting my act together. The technical point which helps me the most on days like today is to drive that back knee into the hill. Digging in the little toe on the back leg does this also.

As much as weighting the back foot is crucial, that alone won't get the back ski carving, YMMV. Since you can't "cowboy" the back leg without weighting it, focusing on the little toe/cowboy leg seems to accomplish both.

Regardless, I still ended the day with snow packed into the vents on the top of my helmet due a tumble I took over a water bar. Oh well.
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Re: Newbie

Postby RobRox » Sat Dec 23, 2017 12:27 pm

Teletumbling gets us all.
Go for adventure, take pix, but make certain to bring'em back alive!
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Re: Newbie

Postby Digger » Sat Dec 23, 2017 3:32 pm

High learning curve = high rewards. Stick with it...it's worth it.
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Re: Newbie

Postby MikeK » Sat Dec 23, 2017 8:31 pm

I bet you fell a lot when you learned to walk. No shame there.
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Re: Newbie

Postby oldschool » Sun Dec 24, 2017 10:51 am

My advice as a self taught decent enough tele skier is the following:

I learned and improved most at a little local place here just doing laps on the blues and blacks in a session once a week on the night my kids were at ski club with their school. I pushed myself to link turns in the bumps and ski as smoothly as I could.

I picked up Paul Parker's book maybe 10 years ago and found it a decent investment

I think the toughest conditions aside from ice are easier courdoroy that is super packed and glades where you are often skiing in slots packed by other skiers and snowboarders which limit where you can turn. I tend to parallel a bit in these spots now to help hold my speed down, mixing in tele turns when I feel like it. For this reason, I think blues and some blacks can be good slopes to learn on if you take your time and ski a few turns and then stop then repeat. Having a decent fall line/slope helps with turn initiation, I think, as opposed to trying this on corderoy where you'd need to build some speed to accomplish a turn, having gravity to help make a turn from a standing start has helped me initially and I focused on linking them after that.
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Re: Newbie

Postby Williamtele » Wed Dec 27, 2017 9:29 am

Hi Bill,

The only thing that I would add is the notion of "constant pressure." Often, with skiers learning the tele turn, there is a tendency to pick up, or un-weight the inside ski during the turn. Modern alpine and tele technique teaches the skier to move the COM (sorry PSIA alert- Center of Mass) across that ski at turn initiation, keeping weight and pressure on it.

In practical terms this means that as you perform your lead change, try to keep pressure on both skis. If you can preserve some of the pressure on the old lead ski through the turn, it will result in a better weighted (and more balanced) trailing ski. Striding, hopping, "scraping mud off your boot" drills are all helpful, along with monomarks (turns with no lead change).

best, Bill (Level 111????)
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Re: Newbie

Postby North816 » Wed Dec 27, 2017 2:56 pm

Williamtele wrote:The only thing that I would add is the notion of "constant pressure."


This is really good advice - I struggle to force my legs to forget the years of alpine turns and into tele turns. For me it boils down to focusing on executing a "squeeze" with my two legs rather than a "grind" with my outside ski. It's more of a "squeeze" feeling to press both legs down on the snow than standing hard on one ski and grinding the edge into the snow.
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Re: Newbie

Postby Digger » Sun Jan 14, 2018 2:30 pm

Another thought to consider on modern tele gear. You are not doing a lunge. You are doing a split squat. When you are standing still in your tele stance you should be able to lift you lead ski off the snow. If not your rear ski is too far back and will result in a fakemark.
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