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X-training help for heavy Tele

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Re: X-training help for heavy Tele

Postby oldschool » Tue Jul 04, 2017 11:43 am

Hi Mike,

Just let the dark side in - it will grow strong in you soon enough.

Some observations about what you've noted.

Hardpack - so my personal view is that some of the hardest tele has to be skiing packed groomers. I try to avoid that as much as I can - I'm not typically skiing powder mind you but will spend most of my time skiing blacks if I can for the fun and the quality of the snow. How to get there? My advice would be just get on them. I am guessing also that you have been going over near your way - Bristol perhaps - I just don't bother skiing at the locals around here anymore as the conditions just suck. A cheap place with some decent conditions a lot of the time is Snow Ridge - a guy who skis there a lot told me that the benefit of going there is you spend another 30 min in the car relative to our local places but don't stand in any lines. It is pretty short but has some fun terrain. For better skiing go to the Adks - you can PM me about that and I can suggest some economical approaches that might work for you.

Getting fit - each year I threaten to do preseason conditioning for real. I take a spin class twice per week and still work it hard enough but it's not enough days per week or the correct muscles to really put you in shape. I may try other stuff. Chair sits against a wall might be a good one. But each year it's the same for me - first day is a hard one and my legs are burning after a couple runs and really, really toasted by mid afternoon. I go until the end of the day though. Over the season I notice that I get stronger - that's not the spinning as that's constant, it's the skiing that puts me in shape and I only get in about six or so days per year these past two years or so, but still I improve a lot. All this means I'm hitting stride near the end of the season. That could be accelerated with a few more trips in January - the past few years conditions have been mediocre still then so I've not bothered to make the trip. Maybe also do jump ups on a box or something.

Getting better - my biggest improvement came from going at the local place and skiing the little blacks they had and pushing myself to ski the bumps, with a focus on linking a few bumps at a time. My kids did ski club through their school through middle school time and I liked going on that night just to ride the lift and see them here or there and ski by myself on tele gear. I'd ski for an hour or two then grab dinner and a couple pints and then work on bumps some more. I got better and really found my edges that way though the Kondors I was skiing were shaped so I felt that immediately - just took some time to realize where to pressure using your big toe side or pinky toe side, etc. Paul Parker's book was useful for me a bit too.

Gear - my stuff is still old and works just fine - I started on Karhu Kondors in 194s and they were ok until I began following my kids in the bumps and in the trees especially. You need a shorter ski to ski glades around here - also, I find paralleling occasionally in the glades is a big help for me as trying to tele all of it is pretty tough especially when its tracked well and you're following a fast path. I currently am still skiing my Merrell Comps that were resoled, K2 Piste Pipes in 183 with Rottefella Cobras as the binding - I ski double blacks on that and while I continuously threaten to get some plastics, I don't have the coin to shell for them for the amount of skiing I do, plus I do like the comfort of my boots - You might want to try some shorter skis than the Tuas - they are likely oriented for touring and tele at a downhill place on more touring oriented mountain skiis is going to make you more tired for sure.
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Re: X-training help for heavy Tele

Postby MikeK » Tue Jul 04, 2017 3:10 pm

Hi Old School, thanks for the info.

Well, perhaps getting a bit personal but neither my wife nor myself are working right now and we have 3 babies, so things are tight on the money front. Skiing next year will likely be what I usually do (XCD where I can find snow) but I'll be looking to snap up some deals to try to get some use with my plastic. I'd love to get back to Gore and try Snowridge, but I don't know that I'll be able to take the time to do so or have the money for the next few years. Snow ridge I can get to for a day trip, so maybe... and it's reasonably priced... so it's on my radar.

I really dislike Bristol. It's expensive, the conditions usually suck and the terrain is not interesting. Terrain is the least of my concerns now though. I'd really just like decent, consistent conditions to get the feel. There are a few other places, but I tried them last year and I was a bit disappointed.

My skis aren't that long. They are 185cm and I'm quite used to skiing on a ski that long. My other pair that I haven't tried yet are less than 180... I forget what length they are though but they aren't touring skis. I've skied really short, shaped skis and I don't like them. I like at least 175.
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Re: X-training help for heavy Tele

Postby Williamtele » Fri Jul 07, 2017 11:13 am

Getting fit - hike up a mountain and run down. If your quads don't hurt after that, find a bigger mountain.
Getting better - take a lesson or go to a "telefest" event and do a clinic. Oh, and spend the kids' college money on NTN gear.
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Re: X-training help for heavy Tele

Postby Go Fish » Mon Jul 17, 2017 10:04 pm

Spend $100 -$150 bucks on some Craig's List SL racing skis and stop worrying about your gear being able to deal with hard pack. If the skis are tuned they will rail on the nastiest conditions. If they don't rail, all you need to focus on is technique.

I am a fat ass old guy that relies on technique and gear. At this stage of my life I am not strong and I will never be again. I started tele over 20 years ago and it was on leather and a pair of repurposed, used up alpine skis. Now I'm on Crispi World Cup boots, NTN bindings and, by the luck of having a good job, a selection of alpine skis.

Tele skis suck on-piste.
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Re: X-training help for heavy Tele

Postby RobRox » Tue Jul 18, 2017 8:41 am

Echo that on hiking...throw some tools into that pack, do some good.

Also agree, SL skis will tell all
Go for adventure, take pix, but make certain to bring'em back alive!
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Re: X-training help for heavy Tele

Postby Joe » Sat Jul 29, 2017 3:54 pm

Heliums are misery sticks for the new millenium. I got some after a few years transitioning from floppy skinnies to plastic powder to area hardpack. They instantly turned me from lower intermediate to flailing loser. Just too flimsy on hardpack unless you are strong. In which case you don't need 2 ounce skis...
I ditched them for a rented pair of rossignol T-something, or K2 something-stinx and was cranking turns like a madman the first pass.

Get yourself some lightly used mass produced tele boards from 10-15 years ago and you will have some decent all around planks for short bread. I think the Heliums were based on the Big Easy which a lot of people liked for learning.
They were also making women's tele skis by then so maybe you could find a cheap used pair and save your wife some misery as well :mrgreen:
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Re: X-training help for heavy Tele

Postby benny » Mon Jul 31, 2017 5:26 pm

Joe wrote:Heliums are misery sticks for the new millenium. I got some after a few years transitioning from floppy skinnies to plastic powder to area hardpack. They instantly turned me from lower intermediate to flailing loser. Just too flimsy on hardpack unless you are strong. In which case you don't need 2 ounce skis...
I ditched them for a rented pair of rossignol T-something, or K2 something-stinx and was cranking turns like a madman the first pass.

Get yourself some lightly used mass produced tele boards from 10-15 years ago and you will have some decent all around planks for short bread. I think the Heliums were based on the Big Easy which a lot of people liked for learning.
They were also making women's tele skis by then so maybe you could find a cheap used pair and save your wife some misery as well :mrgreen:


I'll bet that just about any generic alpine ski made in the last decade would be easier on resort. They can be had for almost nothing at a ski swap.
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Re: X-training help for heavy Tele

Postby MikeK » Thu Aug 03, 2017 3:55 pm

I have these Stocklis:

Image

They aren't rockered, but they are a semi-modern all mountain ski. Not too stiff, good shape (I think 18m radius?).
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Re: X-training help for heavy Tele

Postby The Court General » Tue Sep 19, 2017 7:22 pm

Flexibility is a key trait that sometimes gets overlooked. Flexibility will help you when you get into trouble and helps prevent injuries. Beyond that, just being in good overall shape is all anyone really needs, unless you are or trying to be an olympian. Telemarking will keep you in shape over the winter, especially if you are getting up the mountain on your own power.
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Re: X-training help for heavy Tele

Postby MikeK » Wed Sep 20, 2017 10:20 am

I did find out one thing this summer thus far... biking alone does not keep you in very good all-around condition. Typically I hike, paddle and bike but this summer, because of our new kids, I only get limited time and hiking and paddling takes big blocks. Thus I've been getting my best bang for the buck by doing regular, but short excursion MTB.

Wound up with a babysitter last week for a few hours and the wife and I went for a half day hike. I was so SORE! Biking is a million times lower impact, even advanced level MTB. I think my skiing is going to suffer due to this. Even though skiing is lower impact, the balance and stability muscles are very underutilized in biking (although you would think not).

I have no idea how it would affect resort tele, but I think if I had my choice I'd do a lot more intensive elevation gain hiking.
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